BaliPure nabs third place, beats UST

first_imgView comments PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netBaliPure turned back University of Santo Tomas anew, 25-23, 25-19, 25-11 to finish in third place in the Shakey’s V-League Season 13 Reinforced Conference Monday at Philsports Arena in Pasig.Katherine Morrell propelled the Water Defenders, unloading 24 points, 22 of which coming off spikes on top of 18 excellent digs.ADVERTISEMENT Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 MOST READ EDITORS’ PICK Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes We are young EJ Laure fired 14 points to lead UST while Cherry Rondina finished with 10.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Dzi Gervacio added nine markers, while Kaylee Manns got eight to help BaliPure sweep the best-of-three series.“Today, we played a lot more solid as a team I think it was obvious that we were the aggressor the whole game,” said Manns.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“I think we proved that we got the grasp and got better as a team. We ended the season on a good note.”BaliPure stamped its class with Morrell taking control in all three sets to finish off the sluggish Tigresses in straight sets. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND McGregor to be a father after historic win, wants UFC equity As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exerciselast_img read more

Cartoon: Ways to Improve Cloud Security

first_imgTags:#cloud#Virtualization Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts david strom (click to enlarge)SHI Cloud CLOUDVILLE Cartoon by Dave Blazek is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at blog.shicloud.com. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting We continue our series of cartoons from Cloudville, that mythical but somewhat familiar place where the laws of IT don’t quite seem to apply. This week we take another look at cloud security, and it reminds me of Doc Searls buzzword generator that you can find here if you want even more humor in your life. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Yuki Bhambri qualifies for Australian Open main draw

first_imgIndian tennis star Yuki Bhambri on Sunday qualified for the main draw of the Australian Open.The 25-year-old came back from behind and defeated Peter Polansky of Canada in the third and final qualifying match 1-6, 6-3, 6-3 in Melbourne.In his third and final qualifying match, the 25-year-old player struggled with his serve in the opening set before Polanksy pocketed the set with ease. But he bounced back in the remaining two sets and won the match in one hour and 55 minutes.The final set followed a similar pattern and Bhambri grabbed the only break point that came his way to book his berth in the main draw of this year’s first grand slam.This will be Bhambri’s third appearance in a Grand Slam tournament. He had featured in the Australian Open in 2015 and 2016 but lost to Andy Murray and Tomas Berdych respectively in the first round.”I think it was a nervous start but once I got my rhythm a little bit, I started playing more freely. Hoping I can win a few rounds in the main draw,” Bhambri told The Hindu after his win.Meanwhile, another Indian player Ramkumar Ramanathan lost a three-setter to world No. 109 Vasek Pospisil (Canada) in the final round of qualifying.World No. 139 Ramkumar came back to win the second set but eventually lost 4-6, 6-4, 4-6 in one hour, 44 minutes.last_img read more

9 months agoDybala backing Juventus move for Pogba

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Dybala backing Juventus move for Pogbaby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the lovePaulo Dybala admits he’d like to see Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba return to Juventus.Dybala was asked about again playing with his good friend.“I’d always like to play with someone of his level. Whatever decision he makes, I always wish him the best of luck,” replied Dybala.“Everyone knows how important Cristiano Ronaldo is for us and what he represents for our opponents too. He gives everything, whether it’s in training or a match situation, and also sets a good example for youngsters.“I’d say Lionel Messi and Ronaldo are on the same level. As for the future, Neymar and above all Kylian Mbappé have what it takes to match them.“As for myself, I have changed my style of play recently and learned so much by working with great champions. It’s quite a mature and experienced squad in Turin, but that really helps a young player like me, because you learn and absorb their mentality.” last_img read more

A way to speed up reaction discoveries using automation

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Science More information: Snap deconvolution: An informatics approach to high-throughput discovery of catalytic reactions , Science  14 Jul 2017: Vol. 357, Issue 6347, pp. 175-181, DOI: 10.1126/science.aan1568 , http://science.sciencemag.org/content/357/6347/175AbstractWe present an approach to multidimensional high-throughput discovery of catalytic coupling reactions that integrates molecular design with automated analysis and interpretation of mass spectral data. We simultaneously assessed the reactivity of three pools of compounds that shared the same functional groups (halides, boronic acids, alkenes, and alkynes, among other groups) but carried inactive substituents having specifically designed differences in masses. The substituents were chosen such that the products from any class of reaction in multiple reaction sets would have unique differences in masses, thus allowing simultaneous identification of the products of all transformations in a set of reactants. In this way, we easily distinguished the products of new reactions from noise and known couplings. Using this method, we discovered an alkyne hydroallylation and a nickel-catalyzed variant of alkyne diarylation. Schematic representation of experimental design and analysis. Credit: Science  14 Jul 2017: Vol. 357, Issue 6347, pp. 175-181 © 2017 Phys.org Discovering new chemical reactions with useful applications is generally a laborious process. It typically involves combining large groups of reagents two at a time with a catalyst then studying the molecular makeup to see what might be useful—the more experiments conducted, the more likely chemists will find something new and useful. This situation is unfortunate, because the discovery of new reactions leads to the development of new products. This is why some chemists seek ways to automate at least some of the process. In this new effort, the researchers describe a technique that involves the use of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry GC/MS device, a sealed 96-well plate, and a slew of spreadsheet macros.In general, the new technique involves loading up the wells with reactants, adding different amounts of ligand and metal combinations, and heating them to 100°C for 18 hours. That is followed up by using GC/MS to observe changes in each of the wells and analyzing the results using spreadsheet macros. More specifically, the technique involves starting with just three compounds divided into pools that belong to the same type of molecular function group. Before the reactions are induced, inert substitutes are added, each varying in mass. When the reactions occur, the unique mass of each allows for easy detection by GC/MS and subsequent analysis using the macros.The researchers report that their technique speeds up the process used for discovering useful new reactions by a factor of three by automating some of the time-consuming steps. They claim it works as advertised, noting that they used it to discover a three-component, nickel-catalyzed diarylation of alkynes.center_img (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the University of California and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found a way to automate reaction discoveries, thereby speeding up the process. In their paper published in the journal Science, Konstantin Troshin and John Hartwig describe their process, how well it works, and a discovery they have already made using it. Using a nickel catalyst with hydrocarbons to make fatty acids Explore further Citation: A way to speed up reaction discoveries using automation (2017, July 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-07-reaction-discoveries-automation.htmllast_img read more

Spanish cable operator ONOs TiVo offering has now

first_imgSpanish cable operator ONO’s TiVo offering has now surpassed 150,000 customers, according to company stats. The news marks a big increase in uptake in recent months, with the firm reporting last month it had close to 100,000 TiVo customers at the end of 2012, or 11% of its TV user base.Ono said the new TiVo milestone was down to investment by the firm, which has now made the service available across its entire fibre network, starting at just €5 per month.“Our goal is to continue expanding the number of users and continue working on new products,” said Guillermo Mercader, director general of ONO residential, adding that future updates will make the most of Ono’s fibre optic network.last_img read more

A note from the editor Please consider making a v

first_imgA note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS… A freedom of information campaigner has vowed to continue his six-year battle to uncover the grim truth about universal credit and its impact on disabled people and other groups fighting poverty.John Slater has been using freedom of information laws since 2012 in an attempt to force the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to reveal the serious flaws at the heart of its new benefits system.Slater, who has an extensive background in software development and programme management in industry, has submitted scores of requests under the Freedom of Information Act in the last six-and-a-half years.But his attempts to secure information that he believes should be publicly available have been repeatedly obstructed by DWP’s frequent breaches of freedom of information laws.He first became intrigued in universal credit in early 2012 after claims from work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith that DWP was going to complete the move to universal credit within just five years, a claim he knew was a “ludicrously short timescale for such a complex programme”.But he was also alarmed to hear about DWP’s plans to adopt an “agile” approach to developing the programme, something that had never been attempted on such a large and complex programme.Agile is a technique used mostly for small IT projects and which relies on flexibility, responding rapidly to change and making frequent and continual improvements.None of these, Slater knew, were descriptions usually associated with DWP, or the ministers in charge of the programme, including Iain Duncan Smith.He therefore began asking DWP questions about Agile, the risks the department associated with the programme and the “milestones” it had set to measure the progress of universal credit, through freedom of information (FoI) requests.But right from the start, the department placed every obstacle it could in his way.In May 2012, Slater told DWP that it had breached its legal duty to respond to freedom of information requests within 20 working days.Although the department responded to his complaint later the same day, it then relied on an exemption under the act, claiming that releasing the information would “prejudice the free and frank provision of advice” or the “effective conduct of public affairs”.Slater did not finally secure all the information he was seeking until April 2016, nearly four years later, following a series of tribunal hearings and appeals. The information he received, he says, “did not show a well-run programme”.He says he has continued to ask questions about the programme for more than six years because he is “stubborn”.“As long as the DWP tries to hide what is really going on within UC, I will keep asking reasonable questions and asking for information that should shine a light on what’s actually happening.”He adds: “I suspect that if the DWP hadn’t fought so hard to prevent me getting the risks, issues and milestones and been so dishonest I may well have stopped after that initial FoI request.”Since that first FoI, most of his requests have initially been refused by DWP, resulting in repeated complaints to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).He has so far been successful in every single appeal he has made to the information rights first-tier tribunal, and in responding when DWP has appealed to the tribunal, including cases when DWP has withdrawn its appeal before the hearing.He also complained to the ICO about DWP’s plans to share the sensitive data of claimants of universal credit with other organisations, which he believed breached the Data Protection Act, and which led to ICO raising “significant concerns” and his own subsequent FoI request which he used to ask DWP what measures it had taken to protect claimants’ sensitive personal data.One of his FoI requests asked if DWP had a schedule or plan to show how the rollout of universal credit would be completed by 2021, as it claimed at the time.He said: “Unsurprisingly, no such plan existed. This meant, in my opinion, that the date was a guess.”One of his latest bids for transparency was launched in April 2017, seeking the information that was provided for regular meetings of the programme board that reviews progress on implementing the universal credit system and whose members are mostly senior DWP civil servants.Like many other requests, its progress has been hindered by refusals, delays, appeals, complaints to the information commissioner, further delays, criticism of the department by the commissioner, and yet more of what he told DWP were “outrageous delaying tactics” and “contempt for the law”.He said: “Given how hard it is to get accurate information about universal credit out of the DWP I asked for the packs of information that the UC programme board get given for their monthly meetings.“I assumed that this was likely to show an accurate view of what was really going on with UC.”Last week, Disability News Service revealed how he had forced DWP to deposit significant numbers of previously confidential documents about universal credit in the House of Commons library as a result of this request.Among those documents, Slater found evidence that appears to show that DWP is planning to transfer more benefits – including the contributory version of employment and support allowance – onto the creaking universal credit IT system.He believes this would place greater stress on the system and expose even more disabled people to the stress and anxiety of having to cope with an online system that is already inaccessible to many of them.He is currently waiting for the ICO to rule on whether DWP should release unredacted versions of the documents deposited in the Commons library, which he believes would reveal even more embarrassing information about the impact of universal credit on the people forced to rely on it.Slater – who has worked closely on his campaigning with Disabled People Against Cuts – believes that universal credit was a “total mess” in its early years, before DWP brought in outside experts to assess what was going wrong.This led to a major “reset” of the programme in 2013, following severe criticism by the government’s own Major Projects Authority.Although Slater suspects it has now improved to some extent, he believes the disaster of the early years of its development means it is never likely to regain that lost ground.He says: “Once something on this scale has gone so horribly wrong, I don’t think you can ever fully recover it and get it to the place it would have been if it had been run properly from the start. I’ve seen this with other programmes and projects.”And he believes the senior civil servants leading on universal credit “are only just waking up to what it means to deliver change on this scale”.But he also believes that DWP has failed to think about the impact of such major reform on the claimants themselves, including sick and disabled people, and “fails to reflect or take account of people’s real lives”.“I don’t think they give a damn about the claimants. I think they are almost seen as a nuisance,” he says.The warnings and concerns of disabled activists, politicians and other professionals suggest he is right.Campaigners have repeatedly warned that universal credit is “rotten to the core”, with “soaring” rates of sanctions and foodbank use in areas where it has been introduced, while, in June, a report by the National Audit Office said DWP was failing to support “vulnerable” claimants and was unable to monitor how they were being treated under universal credit.Secret DWP reviews have already been carried out into the deaths of at least four universal credit claimants that have been “linked to DWP activity”.Disability News Service also reported earlier this month how a man with learning difficulties died a month after attempting to take his own life, following a move onto the “chaotic” universal credit system that left him hundreds of pounds in debt. It is not clear whether this was one of the four deaths reviewed by DWP.And only last week, the UN’s special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Professor Philip Alston, said universal credit had “built a digital barrier that effectively obstructs many individuals’ access to their entitlements”.Slater agrees with this and warns of the “unexpected and unintended consequences” of the rush to rely on an online system, particularly as the numbers moving on to universal credit continue to increase and DWP continues to introduce major alterations to the software that powers the system.He also agrees with Alston’s conclusion that the government’s “test and learn” approach “could treat vulnerable people like guinea pigs and wreak havoc in real people’s lives”.Slater says: “The drive to reduce costs and automate parts of the UC process, especially sanctions, will cause major problems unless the DWP spends the time to think about and talk to people who are using the system.“I think as the UC system becomes more complex and things are automated, we will see more and more unexpected and unintended consequences.“For example, in the recent Panorama program a man was sanctioned because his work coach was away and a meeting couldn’t take place.“If the DWP is going to automate more of the process, this is only going to get worse for people.”He fears that universal credit will never work properly because DWP refuses to listen to claimants, particularly those with the highest support needs and the most complex barriers to using the system.In the meantime, he intends to continue probing the flaws of universal credit with his freedom of information requests.He says: “As long as the DWP keeps trying to present universal credit in an unrealistically positive light, I will keep trying to get information that shows what is actually going on.“This is why we have the Freedom of Information Act.“I don’t like organisations that are dishonest and use their size and power to bully people and impose their will or get away with mistakes that should be made public.”last_img read more

JULIE COLLIER Champions League Preview

first_imgCHAMPIONS LEAGUE Julie Collier looks ahead to the midweek Champions League action including BARCELONA v SPURS and LIVERPOOL v NAPOLI with some recommended bets. LATEST STARSPORTS.BET MARKET<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>< BET NOW starsports.bet or 08000 521 321last_img read more

New gag rule may adversely impact health care of pregnant women

first_img Source:https://www.utexas.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 12 2018A new Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) study on Texas organizations receiving family planning funds finds that proposed federal guidelines restricting abortion counseling and referrals for Title X providers may adversely impact the health care of pregnant women.The study, published in Contraception, compares pregnancy options counseling and referral practices at state-funded and federal Title X-funded family planning organizations in Texas after the state enforced a policy in 2013 restricting abortion referrals for providers participating in state-funded programs. Pregnancy options counseling consists of providing information on parenting, adoption and abortion. Referrals can include handing out a list of providers, connecting patients to programs for financial assistance and making an appointment for the patient.Proposed changes to the Title X guidelines prohibit organizations from receiving funds if they provide comprehensive abortion referrals. This new ‘gag rule,’ similar to a policy implemented in Texas in 2013, states that organizations and providers receiving family planning funds must not “provide or promote elective abortions.” The changes would severely limit providers’ abilities to provide medically appropriate information about abortion to the nearly 4 million clients who rely on Title X-funded services nationwide.The study found a major discrepancy between abortion referrals and referrals for other pregnancy-related care. At both Title X and state-only funded organizations, if providers did offer patients information about abortion services at all, they typically only gave patients a list of facilities that provided abortion, which was not always up to date. In contrast, providers were more willing to offer additional information and referrals for prenatal appointments.At the time of the study, Title X providers were required to provide abortion referrals upon request, but the new guidelines do not require organizations to provide abortion referrals at all. Even in the case that organizations choose to offer a list of women’s health providers to someone explicitly seeking information about abortion, organizations may not distinguish between those that offer abortion services and those that offer only prenatal care.Related StoriesJohns Hopkins experts release digital health roadmapGender inequality bad for everyone’s health finds researchCannabis could help people with opioid addiction”None of the organizations in our study provided abortions, but the people we interviewed were worried that they could lose their family planning funding just by sharing information about abortion. They feared this might be seen as ‘promoting’ abortion, which would violate state policy,” said Kari White, Ph.D., lead author of the study and investigator at TxPEP, part of the Population Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin. “What we saw in Texas is likely to happen on a national level under the proposed Title X guidelines that include similar restrictions.”The study also found that all Title X-funded organizations offered pregnancy options counseling while less than half of the state-funded organizations did. “Our study shows that if the policy does not require providers to counsel patients about all their pregnancy options, including abortion, providers often don’t,” said Kristine Hopkins, Ph.D., TxPEP investigator and an author on the study. “This policy is inconsistent with best practices for patient-centered care for pregnant women. When providers cannot even discuss abortion as an option with women experiencing unplanned pregnancies, it may not be seen as a valid choice–this intensifies abortion stigma.”The study took place between November 2014 and February 2015. The conclusions are based on interviews with administrators, medical directors, clinical services directors, and clinicians from 15 Title X-funded organizations and 22 state-funded organizations.Major medical associations, such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that women receive options counseling and referrals to appropriate sources of care. Restricting options counseling and referrals can pose ethical dilemmas for medical practitioners who seek to follow medical best practices for pregnant patients.last_img read more

Promising radioisotope couple for cancer diagnosis and therapy

first_imgThe concept radiotheranostics using 211At and 123I for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Combination of SPECT imaging using 123I-labeled RGD peptide with targeted alpha therapy using 211At-labeled RGD peptide could be useful for personalized medicine to cancer.Radioisotopes — atoms displaying radioactivity — can be used for both diagnosing and treating cancer. For diagnosis, radioisotopes that emit gamma rays are used because of their penetrating capability, while for treatment, isotopes emitting alpha particles, beta particles, or similar cytotoxic radiation are needed. (Cytotoxicity refers to the ability to kill or damage cells; in this case, cancer cells.) In recent years, an approach combining therapy and diagnosis both based on radioisotopes, called ‘radiotheranostics’, has gained significance. The key idea is that both the diagnostic and the therapeutic isotope can be brought to a tumor by attaching it to the same carrier molecule. Now, Kazuma Ogawa from Kanazawa University and colleagues have synthesized a radiotheranostic system with astatine (At-211) as the alpha-particle emitter and iodine (I-123) as the gamma-radiation source.A few types of molecules can be used as radioisotope carriers. Ogawa and colleagues were able to use a peptide (a biomolecule consisting of a chain of amino acids) as the carrier for both the astatine and the iodine isotope. Specifically, they worked with a peptide containing the so-called RGD sequence of amino acids. The RGD motif plays an important role in cell membrane binding; its cell-adhesive activity makes it a good component for designing molecules for targeting tumors.The theranostic carrier molecules were synthesized through a series of chemical reactions, the last step being a halogenation — the replacement of a particular molecular component by a halogen. (Both astatine and iodine are halogens, having similar chemical properties.)Related StoriesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerSpecial blood test may predict relapse risk for breast cancer patientsAfter the successful synthesis of the At-211 and I-125 carrier molecules, the researchers tested their behavior in vivo. They simultaneously injected the two compounds in tumor-bearing mice, and looked at the biodistribution of the radioactive isotopes — that is, in which parts of the body they occur, and how abundantly. The main finding was that the At-211- and I-125-labeled RGD peptides displayed biodistributions that were very similar, with a high accumulation in the tumor — a prerequisite for operating as a theranostic system. (Another iodine isotope, I-123, is foreseen to be the diagnostic radioisotope, but I-125 has a much longer half-life, making it easier to work with in the present experiments.)The work of Ogawa and colleagues is an important step forward in the development of radiotheranostics. Quoting the scientists: “This method could be applicable to other peptides directly targeted to cancer. Moreover, future efforts should be focused on application of other radiohalogens … as positron emitters for PET [positron–electron tomography] imaging ….”BackgroundRadioisotopesRadioactive atoms (radioisotopes) decay into other atoms, thereby emitting radiation. Different types of radiation occur, including alpha particle (helium nucleus) emission, and gamma ray (highly energetic electromagnetic radiation) emission. The former can be used for treatment — alpha particles can destroy cancer cells — while the latter can be used for imaging.The goal of combining both diagnosis and treatment in one approach based on radioisotopes has led to the concept of ‘radiotheranostics’. The key property of a radiotheranostic system is that both radioisotopes target the same area in the body, a tumor in the case of cancer — their biodistribution has to be the same.Kazuma Ogawa from Kazanawa University and colleagues have now developed a radiotheranostic system, with an astatine isotope as the alpha-particle source and an iodine isotope as the gamma-ray source. Importantly, both atoms are halogens; because they belong to the same group in the periodic table, they have similar chemical properties. Because of this chemical similarity, the scientists could use the same carrier molecule for both isotopes (the carrier molecule delivers the radioisotope to the targeted body part). Source:https://www.kanazawa-u.ac.jp/e/ May 9 2019Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Omega a promising combination of radioisotope-carrying molecules for use in radiotheranostics — a diagnosis-and-treatment approach based on the combination of medical imaging and internal radiation therapy with radioactive elements.last_img read more