Hong Kong name squad for Kenya Tour

first_img0Shares0000Hong Kong line up ahead of the 2016 test against the Simbas at the RFUEA Ground.NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 12 – Head coach Leigh Jones has named a 28 man squad for Hong Kong’s tour of Kenya ahead of their two international test matches against Simbas at the RFUEA Grounds.The Dragons, who are scheduled to arrive in Nairobi on Friday August 18, will face off against the Simbas on Sunday August 20 and Saturday August 26. The squad includes Liam Owens, Matt Roslee and Mike Parfitt who all earned their first caps in last year’s 34-10 loss to the Kenyans in Nairobi as well as eight other players namely Alex Ng Wai Shing, Ben Higgins, Fin Field, Jack Parfitt, Jamie Tsang, Nick Hewson, Tyler Spitz and Tony Wong Ho – yeung who all were part of last year’s travelling party.Hong Kong squad to KenyaAlex Ng Wai Shing, Benjamin Higgins, Callum McFeat Smith, Daniel Barlow, Dayne Jans, Evi Saua, Fin Field, Jack Parfitt, James Christie, James Cunningham, Jamie Tsang, Kyle Sullivan, Lex Rauca, Liam Galleher, Liam Owens, Liam Slatem, Marcus Ramage, Matthew Lamming, Matthew Roslee, Michael Parfitt, Nicholas Hewson, Pierce Mackinlay-West, Robert Keith, Sam Purvis, Sebastien Alfonsi, Thomas Lamobley, Tyler Spitz, Tony Wong Ho-yeung  Management: Leigh Jones (Head Coach), Andrew Hall, Craig Hammond, Mark Fatialofa (Assistant Coaches), Luke Davey (Strength & Conditioning), Chris Davies (Analyst), Amanda O’Reilly (Physiotherapist), Seth Chan (Physio Assistant)By Kenya Rugby-0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Marshfield archery takes fourth in NASP competition

first_imgFor Hub City TimesMARSHFIELD – Marshfield High School archery placed fourth as a team in National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP) tournament competition held Feb. 9 in Gilman.The tournament saw 23 schools in competition. For the tournament, each archer gets an individual score in their division and if the school has enough archers, they can also shoot as a team. The archers then shoot three scoring rounds at 10 meters and three scoring rounds at 15 meters.Marshfield High School had enough archers to shoot as a team, but the Middle school shot as individuals.Marshfield High School placed fourth, scoring 3125. Top archers for Marshfield were: Jeremiah Apsey with 281, who placed ninth out of 59 in the high school boys division; McKenzie Wilsmann with 280, who placed fourth out of 75 in the high school girls division; and Lindsey Tyrolt with 276, placing ninth out of 75 in the high school girls division.Marshfield Middle school top archers were: Raina Manlick with 274, placing ninth out of 86 middle school girls; Jasmine Schmidt with 266, receiving 11th out of 86 middle school girls; and Kody Weigel with 259, ranking him 28th out of 107 middle school boys.last_img read more

Issues in Supply Chain Management Can Be Catastrophic During Peak Season

first_imgAs we all are well aware, the holiday shopping season seems to be starting earlier with each passing year. It was October when I saw the first commercial advertising for the holiday season.While holiday shopping patterns in retail stores is something we may all notice, there are other areas within the business that may not be as visible to the customer but are just as impactful on the business. The one thing that I have witnessed firsthand is how retailers’ new strategy of providing more options to consumers earlier in the shopping season is affecting issues in supply chain management.“Peak,” as it is referred to, is the time leading up to Christmas when holiday order volume increases dramatically. That’s roughly fourteen weeks of what is now becoming pure chaos for logistics providers.- Sponsor – Here are two key areas where the industry is failing to keep up with the changes in holiday shopping habits and some basic steps that can be taken to address the growing issues in supply chain management.Volume Projections: It’s a Guessing GameMost retailers have analytic models that produce estimated volume projections to determine the number of orders that will be passing through the supply chain network. This information is passed on to contracted transportation providers, allowing them to plan for the staffing models necessary to handle the anticipated product volume.Despite all the computer analytics being used, the one thing that cannot be easily forecasted is how online ordering can be affected by the unpredictability of human behavior. This is especially true from Thanksgiving Day through Cyber Monday. In talking with my loss prevention peers in both retail and transportation, consumer sentiment was grossly underestimated going into the holiday season. So regardless of the current political atmosphere, the Federal Reserve raising interest rates, or the potential that North Korea may launch a nuclear bomb, US consumers were ready to spend money this holiday season.This buying atmosphere creates both a positive and negative scenario for businesses in the supply chain. The obvious positive result is an increase in revenue. However, a less-than-ideal result follows when unplanned volume cripples the infrastructure that moves parcels along the supply chain. This would be the equivalent of a dam breaking fifty miles upriver with all the towns downriver flooded as a result—except the flood comes in the form of packages.To avoid this type of catastrophe from occurring again, retailers must do a better job of preparing for holiday issues in supply chain management. It’s crucial to be ready for a potential spike in online sales and projecting product volumes in real time. This may be challenging since most of these online orders are being placed during the Thanksgiving holiday when the majority of corporate America is out of the office. One solution would be to have retailers streamline the flow of information to logistics providers by providing daily volume-trend monitoring that is communicated immediately to transportation providers.Transportation, Bottlenecks, and a Tangled InfrastructureThe majority of retailers that do business online don’t have their own transportation infrastructure. This means they have to contract out transportation companies to move freight, which can cause additional issues in supply chain management. One of the most costly services in business is transportation. Therefore, most companies will look for the most cost-effective way to move that box from the warehouse to the client. This cost will vary greatly depending on several factors, which include:The time it takes to deliver the package,The distance the package has to travel, andThe method of delivery.Typically, the more convenient the process is for the customer, the higher the transportation cost will be for the retailer. As a result, most companies will look for a balanced approach that will satisfy both the customer expectation and the costs associated with transporting the order.What this means is that everyone is ultimately contracting with everyone else, and parcels can easily transit multiple companies before reaching your doorstep. With each touch point is an exposure to a parcel being lost or stolen. It is difficult to investigate losses in this network when volumes are normal. Add 50 percent or greater volume in a very short time span, and investigating loss becomes nearly impossible.Some of the contributing factors to this loss include lack of management oversight, mis-shipped packages, and theft that is camouflaged due to operational failures. It is critical for transportation providers to be able to plan and manage this volume appropriately.The most common areas where loss occurs during peak are during the morning launch of drivers. This is when the terminal has the most amount of freight on the floor and the least amount of management oversight. Transportation managers should also focus on conducting spot audits of drivers prior to them launching. This will not only keep the drivers honest but also allow management to find misloaded packages that occurred by mistake.Learn more about the third key area where the industry is failing to keep up with changes in holiday shopping habits in the full article, “The Fallout of Holiday Peak,” which was originally published in 2018. This excerpt was updated May 28, 2019. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Team India flunks final, but must build on gains from World Cup

first_imgCUP OF WOE: Sachin Tendulkar made to stand down by the AustraliansOn the night India lost the World Cup final, one of the bowlers ran into a friend. “Hard luck,” said the friend. The player exploded, “What hard luck? Why does everyone say that? We played f***-all. Who knows when,CUP OF WOE: Sachin Tendulkar made to stand down by the AustraliansOn the night India lost the World Cup final, one of the bowlers ran into a friend. “Hard luck,” said the friend. The player exploded, “What hard luck? Why does everyone say that? We played f***-all. Who knows when we’ll ever get to a Cup final again?”As it happens, the young man could play in a couple more World Cups but on that bleak Sunday night when gloom crept into Indian souls like the chill of an advancing Johannesburg autumn, his heart wouldn’t listen to reason or reassurance. He could barely imagine it but by hating defeat so intensely, the cricketer was giving himself the best chance to reach another big final. If being the No. 2 team in the world doesn’t feel good at all, there is only one other alternative.The men in blue headed out of their hotel rooms looking for warm food and cold comfort, a cavalcade of the chronically dejected. That night all the glasses came up half-empty but if Indian cricket learns to look into the distance – admittedly, not its strong suit – its African campaign could be a blueprint for future success and, maybe, a cup running over.En route to the World Cup finals Sourav Ganguly’s team equalled the record for the most successful streak by an Indian team in one-day internationals  – eight straight wins. It matched the run of the 1985 team that won five matches to take the World Championship of Cricket in Australia and three one-dayers after that. India’s record pales in comparison to Australia’s 17 but collective achievement in Indian cricket is rare. For too long has the sport been ruled by the cult and clash of personality and the mammoth weight of some pretty impressive individual records.advertisementCUP OF WOE: India were made to stand down by the AustraliansCaptain Ganguly, who could well be the first militant Bengali after Subhas Chandra Bose, will have no more of it. He is fast becoming the leading pulpitt-humping evangelist of a new church of Indian cricket.Drinking tea in a train-wreck of a hotel room in Durban, windows open to cooling sea breezes off the Indian Ocean, he said, “Individual performances don’t matter at all if the team doesn’t win. Indian cricket has to realise that the team is first: whether you are looking at the past or whether the team has to go ahead in the future.”The future is the only place to go because the past is never as glorious and golden as it is made out to be. The Australians are already in tomorrow, casting long shadows on those who try to follow. India have responded to the rigours and rewards of a nascent professionalism with the enthusiasm of a child who, after days of sliding around his bottom, discovers the heady benefits of being able to walk.They are quick to give credit to their three-man back-up team of professional coach, trainer and physio, use polar wristwatches to monitor their fitness, know how to download the data from the watches onto their personal laptops, and have discovered the use of computer analysis in team planning. Fellows who would struggle to spell “psychologist” sit down with the famous sports shrink Sandy Gordon to discuss insecurity, fear of failure, ambition and come out feeling wiser, less burdened.Radical? For Indian cricket, yes. Australia has been there, done that – and moved on. Diving and slide-tackling in the field is kindergarten stuff. Their specialist fielding and throwing consultant, Mike Young, an ex-baseball player for the San Francisco Giants, knows nothing about cricket fielding, but uses his understanding of motion from baseball to design drills. His brief is to keep the fielders moving, energised and involved and minimise the time taken for a ball to travel from the fielder to the man at the wicket.When the ball goes to a fielder’s “wrong’ side” (i.e. on the left side of a right-hander), usually the fielder picks up the ball, transfers it to his throwing hand, shifts his weight and then throws the ball back. Young taught the Australians to pick up and pivot, transferring the ball from hand to hand during the pivot before hurling it back to the man at the stumps. The fielder can end up off-balance during the throw, but when Andy Bichel ran out Aravinda De Silva in the semi-final, hours of practice turned into something perfect.Young also turned out to be a handy bard who composed a poem about his adopted home which the Aussies chanted and sang after every victory in South Africa. Coach John Buchanan says, “At the moment we do most things everyone else does but we do them a little bit better and more consistently. There is no question we can get better.”advertisementIt could be a frightening thought for anyone trying to catch up, but then it could be an inspiration too – there is always a way, teams must have the will to discover it. The Indians seem to have found theirs. It took a year of thinking and tinkering for their World Cup campaign to come together. The hiring of fitness trainer Adrian LeRoux made a difference to the strength of the bowlers and consequently the pace at which they bowled in South Africa.Andrew Leipus held the bodies of all the main men together with hours of physiotherapy, yards of tape and the pure power of prayer. No matter how loud the howls of protest, Rahul Dravid was given a year with the wicketkeeping gloves in order to lengthen the batting line-up. An idea of the best balanced team for South Africa was devised and stuck to. In South Africa, only two teams looked like they had made progress from the 1999 Cup: Australia, of course, and, surprise, surprise, the consorts of chaos, India, a testimony to persistence with The Plan.India have done a lot right in the past two years, reckons former South African coach Graham Ford, but to keep progressing they need to replace the one important link that will go missing soon. “They need to get another pace bowler into the squad now because they are going to miss Javagal.”The man himself, who went through the World Cup wearing an unusually sunny disposition all the time and a beach hat at practice, believes fast bowlers are like fine china, meant to be handled with care and wrapped in cotton-wool. Only then can they provide service for years. “An Australian or South African bowler may take two years to develop, in India you have to give a guy 3-3 1/2 years, put him on a fitness routine, monitor his progress. If you are thinking of 2007,” Srinath says, “find a guy now.”Australia reaped the benefits of pure pace in the Cup – Brett Lee broke down batting line-ups after injury stopped Jason Gillespie and tiredness slowed Glenn McGrath down. Lee has been shepherded through Australian cricket since 1995 – when it was discovered he was the fastest kid on the block – and let loose on the world only in 1999. South Africa, looking for its successors to the Allan Donald generation, tried the same with the injury-plagued Mfuneko Ngam and are now working on Monde Zondeki.A team insider says, “What we cannot do is bumble along and hope for someone to turn up. That’s the way it has been with us but that’s not the way it works in professional sport anymore.” It means the traditional animosity between selector and player, board and player, the swell of egos must subside to make the team competitive.advertisementSunil Gavaskar believes the team needs to do more, telling INDIA TODAY, “The 2007 World Cup should be the assignment starting now. We must overcome the weaknesses that prevented us from winning this one and consolidate the gains have been made from this trip.” The gains are both cricketing and cultural.Indian cricket knows now why it needs genuine fast bowlers, all-wicket batsmen and the best support staff the BCCI’s money can buy. But like that angry young man on finals night, it must breed dissatisfaction and stoke hunger too. Because finishing second may be noble, and worthy, but it really is no fun.last_img read more