Casablanca Paso Apartments sells in Phoenix

first_imgCooper, Cardinal and Company LLC, a boutique multifamily investment brokerage firm with headquarters in Phoenix, closed the transaction for Casablanca Paso Apartments, a 21-unit turn-key multifamily community located in Phoenix on Monday. The sale price of $750,000 equates to $35,714 per unit or $57.47 per square foot.Jack A. Cardinal, a managing director of the firm, and Jennifer Runyon, an investment associate, represented the seller in the transaction. “The sellers did a great job of updating the interiors of all 21 units, this allowed their team to achieve economically sustainable rents.” stated Cardinal.The 13,050-square foot apartment community was built in 1985 on a 0.46-acre lot.“Witnessing an investor make marked improvements and successfully turn around Casablanca Paso is another positive indicator of the strong Phoenix multifamily market,” said Runyon. “As importantly, it shows what can be accomplished when ownership, management, and leasing roll up their sleeves and executes as a team.”last_img read more

Epidemiologist On Pandemic: ‘We Will Prevail’

first_img Share As with local governments across New York State, East Hampton Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc and town board members have been battling the COVID-19 pandemic on many different fronts, from stocking food pantries to staffing newly opened beaches, while working to keep the public safe.On May 19, the board adopted a resolution naming Dr. Bruce Polsky to the post of medical consultant to the town. Dr. Polsky, who is a leading epidemiologist, as well as an associate dean and professor at NYU Long Island School of Medicine, will advise the town on the science involved as the town and businesses slowly reopen following the two-month shutdown caused by COVID-19.The Independent spoke with Dr. Polsky, who is providing his services to the town gratis, on May 22.“I consider it a civic duty,” he said. Dr. Polsky was asked to compare the battle against COVID-19 with the last great worldwide viral pandemic of 1918-1919, caused by the virus known then as Spanish influenza. While the two viruses are quite different, they share one grim trait: they are highly infectious. The 1918-1919 pandemic struck in three waves. After the first wave, late winter/early spring 1918, there was a lull of several months before the second, and deadliest wave struck, seemingly all at once across the country and around the world in September and October 1918. “A virus never really totally disappears,” Dr. Polsky said. “It is present at low levels. No one knows exactly what causes it to re-emerge with a vengeance like it did in the fall of 1918. I believe that wave of infection was responsible for most of the deaths in that pandemic.”But why did it become widespread at that time? “Some people believe that it caught fire because school went back into session, and people were congregating more. But it is not exactly known why. It’s very speculative.”Could COVID-19 be following the path of the 1918 influenza pandemic?“We could be looking at a repeat of that pattern. That is the fear. That is the concern and that is why when you hear over and over scientific experts comment on that, that is why the majority of us have favored a cautious relaxation of our restrictions.”If you have had COVID-19, will the antibodies developed in your system make you immune to reinfection?“We don’t know. If someone tests positive for antibodies, we don’t know what the role of those antibodies are at this stage.”The hope, Dr. Polsky said, is in developing a vaccine. “I can’t put a timeline on it, but there will be a vaccine, and there will be one or more medicines that treat this thing.”He explained his optimism. “There is enough known about this virus. We have the advantage of knowing its entire genome. And we know its close relatives, the first SARS virus, and the MERS virus. There is a fair amount of information on these viruses so that the idea of developing a direct-acting anti-viral vaccine is something that should be achievable.”As medical consultant to the town, Dr. Polsky will be weighing in on approaches various businesses should take as they begin to get the green light to reopen, like the restaurant business, as well as businesses already open, like hotels.A week before Memorial Day, the East Hampton Town Board sent the governor a letter asking that he bar East End hotels from booking tourists. Local hotel industry representatives blasted the letter. Paul Monte was one of many who said he felt his industry had been “blindsided” by the letter.How should these businesses conduct themselves going forward?“I don’t know what the answer is. The hospitality industry is an up-close and personal industry and that applies to restaurants as well. You go into a restaurant wearing a mask and pull it down each time you take a bite of food? How can that be pleasant?”However, Dr. Polsky believes outdoor dining in East Hampton this season can be a solution. Restaurants that have ample outdoor seating areas, and are willing to reduce capacity to ensure a safe distance between tables, and minimize contact between staff and guests, are likely to get a thumbs up from Dr. Polsky, if and when the industry gets a green light to operate later this summer season.Hotels present another challenge. Because guests must be treated as if they are potentially infectious, masks must be worn by staff and guests. Staff members should have little if any contact with guests. If protocol is followed, “I can’t imagine it is going to be a very pleasant experience for the guests.”Dr. Polsky’s name was first suggested as candidate for consultant by board member David Lys. Fellow councilman Jeffrey Bragman endorsed him as well.Dr. Polsky and his wife began coming out to East Hampton over 20 years ago. “We started as transients, then started renting a house for the season.” They found a year-round rental they liked and took it, with an option to buy. Five years ago, the owner told them he wanted to sell. Now, they split their time between Manhattan and Springs. The talk returned to COVID-19. One book is a must-read, Dr. Polsky said: Pulitzer Prize-winning author Laurie Garrett’s 1994 work, “The Coming Plague.” The book is sold out on Amazon, Dr. Polsky pointed out. “I have been at this a long time. When I say I have hope, it is not based on an emotional level. It is based on the fact that we have the tools to be able to solve this, if we, as we are doing in the scientific community, marshal our forces to do that, that we will prevail.”East Hampton Town Councilman Says More Science NeededBragman suggests two well-known doctors but board declines East Hampton Town Board member Jeff Bragman joined the unanimous vote by his fellow council members May 19 to appoint Dr. Bruce Polsky scientific consultant to the town regarding COVID-19 related issues. But, while he enthusiastically endorsed Dr. Polsky, Bragman feels the more, the merrier when it comes to the science of combatting the viral pandemic. Bragman asked the board to consider appointing two additional scientific consultants, who, like Dr. Polsky, reside in the town. The councilman said both expressed interest in lending their expertise to the many difficult choices the town will have to make in the coming weeks and months. Dr. Michael McDonald, whose resume states that he is “actively engaged in biosecurity, pandemic management, resilience and regeneration operations,” both in the United States and abroad, would bring expertise in battling disease. He also specializes in coping with and responding to natural disasters. Bragman’s other recommendation was Dr. George Dempsey, who practices medicine in the Town of East Hampton. “Dempsey is a well-respected local physician,” Bragman said on Monday. “He provided an early and emphatic warning to ramp up an immediate and energetic response.” At the May 19 meeting, town board members declined Bragman’s invitation to discuss adding the two additional consultants. Bragman said Monday that both could prove invaluable in a crisis that centers on science, along with Dr. Polsky. “Together, these three doctors provide a breadth of medical knowledge necessary to inform town board decisions.” He added that he did not understand why the board would not at least consider the offer of service from the two [email protected]last_img read more

Ineco studies Cairo – Luxor high speed line

first_imgEGYPT: Spanish state-owned engineering consultancy Ineco announced on May 27 that it is to carry out a feasibility study for building a high speed line between Cairo and Luxor.According to Ineco, this 600 km route between the country’s two principal cities would be major addition to Egypt’s tourist infrastructure.A delegation headed by Ineco President Jesús Silva recently met with Egyptian Transport Minister Hany Dahy and other officials. Transport projects currently under development also include lines 4, 5 and 6 of the Cairo metro as well as the Alexandria metro.last_img read more

U14 football team whipped 0-8 by T/dad

first_imgGuyana opened their Caribbean Football Union (CFU) Boys Under-14 Challenge Series in the worst possible manner, suffering an embarrassing 8-0 loss to Trinidad and Tobago on Saturday at the Ergilio Hato Stadium, Curacao. Guyana’s starting XI consisted of Shavid Hernandez, Oswin Archer, Brandon Solomon, Kevin Mullin, Ryquan Brummell, Ofancy Winter, Rajan Ramdeholl (C), Shoran James, Samuel Garnett, Tyrice Dennis and Colin Henriques.The Guyana u14 Boys team departed local shores on Wednesday for Curacao to compete in the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) 2018 Boys’ U14 Challenge Series.Guyana will play their second match on August 8th against Curacao before facing off with Bonaire on the 10th. In their final fixture, the Guyanese will oppose Aruba on the 12th. All matches will be held at the same venue. Brian Joseph is serving as the Head-Coach, while Devnon Winter will serve as the Assistant Coach. Sasha Gouveia and Nico Alstrom will act as the Team Manager and Doctor respectively.last_img read more

United flight attendant of 52 years recalls Jet Age heyday

first_imgLONGMONT, Colo. | Carol Andrews, a United Airlines flight attendant for 52 years with more than 10 million miles under her belt, was showing no signs of slowing down on a recent afternoon as she addressed a lady’s group while dressed in her 1960s United uniform.While the Pinewood Springs resident persisted in offering to show some magic tricks to the century-old Country Club, the lady’s group that meets at the First Lutheran Church in Longmont, it was the stories covering her career that held the room.ADVANCE FOR THE WEEKEND OF JAN. 2 – In this Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014 photo, flight Attendant Carol Andrews poses for a photo in Longmont, Colo. Andrews, a United Airlines flight attendant for 52 years with more than 10 million miles under her belt, was showing no signs of slowing down on a recent afternoon as she addressed a lady’s group while dressed in her 1960s United uniform. (Matthew Jonas/The Daily Times Call via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT“I was reading that the rings of Saturn are made of the lost luggage from the airlines,” Andrews, 74, said with a smile.She was 22 years old in 1963 when she went to the Washington National Airport to talk to the different airlines seeking work. She was finally offered a job with United because her hair color was the same as the recruiter’s wife. However dated and ludicrous that might seem now, it led to a lengthy and storied career.“A week after graduation, I headed off to Chicago for training school,” Andrews said. “I had never flown before, but my hair was the right color. They gave me a standby ticket to depart from Baltimore, then called Friendship, airport. I got on the jump-seat and didn’t know what to expect. I had six weeks of training in Chicago, and it was all about heels, hose and girdles. It was kind of a charm school, though you had to learn about aircraft too.”Speaking to the Times-Call in 2013 as she celebrated her 50th anniversary in the air, Andrews reminisced about the days when flying was something that people dressed up for and looked forward to. “Flying used to be a white-glove service,” she said. “It was luxurious and people got dressed up, but the attire nowadays is comfortable.”A year later, the Times-Call spoke to Andrews again after she had turned down a $100,000 buyout. “I’m just not ready to go,” she said at the time. “I like the variety, the people, and I look forward to going to work every day.”Andrews remembered that she chose to work out of Denver because somebody had told her that there were seven men to every one woman in the region, and she got teary as she recalled first emerging from a plane and seeing the mountains, snow and blue sky.Her memories of her first flight were less fond, as it took her back to Baltimore. Her first trip west, to San Francisco, was a little more glamorous despite being in the middle of the night. During her many Californian flights in what she called the “good old days,” she rubbed shoulders with the likes of Ella Fitzgerald and Marlon Brando. “It was an interesting time,” she said.Another anachronism: She had to resign because she was married. “I hid the marriage for as long as I could, and then my uniform started getting a little bit too tight because I was carrying my son David,” she said. “You could resign, quit or be fired, and I wanted to leave the door open in case I wanted to work there again. I resigned, and there was a class-action case that stayed in the courts for 15 years before they decided that it was discrimination … It was good for me because I could raise my boys.”Even during those 15 years, Andrews fed her flying bug by working on corporate flights until she was eventually hired back.Andrews concluded by saying that, over the past 52 years, much has changed and much is the same. “People are the same,” she said. “They want to be acknowledged, they want to be respected, and they want to get from A to B on time — the same as 50 years ago.”Information from: Daily Times-Call, https://timescall.com/last_img read more

Pets are people, too. Remember that come gift time

first_img In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo a guinea pig santa costume and a small pet habitat are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo Chloe Kardoggian, a 12-year old rescue chihuahua, models a guinea pig elf costume during the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo Pet Holiday Hanukkah dog toys are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Nov. 2, 2016 photo, pet gifts are displayed in a doggie gift bucket containing a Harry Barker fabric doggie bone, a rubber chewy toy and doggie cheese puffs are among holiday pet gifts selected by Oprah Winfrey at the headquarters of “O, The Oprah Magazine,” in New York. According to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group, more than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo Pet Holiday Pie Slice dog treats and Merry Meals dog food are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, photo Pendleton collection bedding, leashes, and coats are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo Bocce’s Bakery Lumps of Coal and other dog treats are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, photo Tinkerbelle the Dog models a Martha Stewart Pets scarf sweater and a Santa hat during the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo Pet Holiday cat toys are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group.(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, photo Tinkerbelle the Dog models a Martha Stewart Pets scarf sweater and a Santa hat during the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)center_img In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo Pet Holiday Bark Beer dog toys are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) PET TOYS: Flatties, some that squeak, are always popular, said Mardi Larson, a spokeswoman for the retail chain PetSmart. And they can be cheap. For the holidays, PetSmart has some with Christmas motifs, like a bright green dinosaur in a Santa cap.“Pets just love to destroy their toys. Flatties are safe because they have no stuffing,” Larson said.You can’t go wrong with balls. Lots of balls. Or go for durable toys in sturdy nylon or rope. Consider safety in such things as sewn-on doodads or other swallowable bits.PET BEDS & BEDDING: Face it, a pet’s bed is part of home decor. You might as well find one that looks reasonably good as a gift. Choose one with a holiday theme for an added festive feel.For a classic or rustic look, PetSmart.com’s exclusive Pendleton collection includes beds in autumn colors or rainbow stripes. The company also has combination gift sets that come with a dog bed, cozy blanket and bone toy for about $20.Petplay.com will donate 20 percent of any pet bed purchased in November to support Movember and the fight against prostate cancer. That includes beds adorned with bright yellow mustaches.Oprah chose as one of her Favorite Things of 2016 the Charles Fradin Home Customizable Pet Blanket. It’s a 60-by-54, micro-fleece printed with an original hand-drawn image of said pet, for $395. Head to Amazon.FOR HUMANS: Gift your animal-loving human a paw pendant, or head to one of the sites that will customize using a pet’s actual paw, including 4pawsforever.org. At Uncommongoods.com, there’s a woman who will make you a pendant from a mold of your pet’s nose. Look for other customizables there, including pet portraits and pillows that look like your dog.There are kits available for your pet lover to make a paw print mold to turn into a tree ornament or garden stone.How about a throw? PetSmart has a red one selling strong emblazoned with: “I Just Want to Drink Wine & Pet My Dog.” $29.99. At Originalterritory.com, there’s a 30-by-40 fleece that reads: “Naps are Better with a Dog.” $19.99.Friendshipcollar.com if just that: A matching collar for pet and bracelet for the human. In a range of designs. $25 and $35.CLOTHES: For the pets. Widely available.Because, equality, PetSmart sells tiny Santa and elf looks for Guinea pigs, complete with pointy hats. They’ve also got a Santa with snorkel and goggles for a fish tank, in place of fish attire.Look around for one that amuses or fits your pet gift recipient’s personality.CATS & DOGS ETC: How about a holiday scratcher, a la the one that looks like a Christmas tree or the one that looks like a sleigh at PetSmart. Lots of these things exist so don’t sweat it.There’s one scratcher shaped like a DJ’s turntable that really spins. It’s adorned with stickers of cat smiley faces, paw prints, photos of fish-shaped cat treats, and faux band stickers, including “Run DOG.” Flat pack cardboard. No glue necessary for assembly. $35. Widely available from a company called Suck UK. Search for DJ Cat Scratching Pad.Holiday stockings are a thing for pets, including one filled with cat balls that comes with a purple feather toy that’s part of the company’s holiday collection. Another for dogs from PetSmart says: “Bones, Bones and more Bones!”There are plenty of little sweaters and collars that are gifty, too, at just about any place that sells pet stuff. You don’t have to spend a lot.WILDLIFE LOVERSThe World Wildlife Fund lets you select two mugs featuring Morten Koldby images of species the nonprofit is working to protect: The tiger, snow leopard, rhino and bison. Choose two different animals or a matching set of the same animal. Each mug holds 12.5 ounces. They’re a thank you for a donation of $55. Go to WWFcatalog.org.Colorful and frameable wildlife photographs are widely available. Hunt around for a favored species and spring for a nice frame.Or pick up a box of animal-theme note cards. Also widely available. While you’re at it, the U.S. Postal Service has Forever 47-cent pet stamps in a book of 20 with photographs by Eric Isselee. Puppies, betta fish, iguanas, mice, hermit crabs, chinchillas, corn snakes and, yes, dogs and cats are among them. Wildlife stamps are also out there.PET TREATSGifty boxed-up collections that look like human food fit right into the humanization of pets trend building over the years, said PetSmart’s Larson.Her company carries treats that look like cannolis and macaroons, along with a bag of treats in the shape of lumps of coal, from Bocce’s Bakery. Organic. $4.49.Outwardhound.com sells a cheery plastic doggie slot machine that will dispense kibble when a dog pulls down a front compartment. $24.99. In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo Chloe Kardoggian, a 12-year old rescue chihuahua, poses for a photo with Santa wearing a guinea pig elf costume during the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo glass bird feeders are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group.(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, photo Burt’s Bees brand grooming products are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, photo the items in the philanthropic collection are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. PetSmart will donate 10% of the proceeds from the sale of these items to PetSmart charities. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo Pet Holiday Ballistic dog toys are on display at the PetSmart holiday collection preview in New York. More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) NEW YORK | Pets are people, too — at least when it comes to holiday gifts.More than half of dog owners and nearly 40 percent of cat owners buy their pets gifts for Christmas or Hanukkah, according to the American Pet Products Association, an industry trade group.Potentially, that’s 39 million dogs and 32 million cats on holiday lists this year, the group reports. And don’t forget all those pet aunts, uncles, grandparents and friends, let alone pleasing favorite pet parents and all-around animal enthusiasts with human gifts just for them.Some ideas:last_img read more

‘It would be amazing business’ – Man United fans excited by fresh transfer news

first_img1 With the transfer window just around the corner, it’s no surprise Premier League clubs are planning their business.Manchester United are the latest team to have a significant rumour reported by the press and it appears, according to Sky Sports, they want to sign Schalke star Leon Goretzka on a pre-contract.The highly-rated Germany starlet, 22, is wanted by a host of huge European clubs, with Bayern Munich, Barcelona, and Liverpool already in the hunt.But now the Red Devils have entered the race to land him, and you can see what Manchester United fans think about that below… Schalke star Leon Goretzka last_img read more