Hee Young Park wins women’s Victoria Open

first_img SUBSCRIBE TO US Last Updated: 9th February, 2020 18:36 IST Hee Young Park Wins Women’s Victoria Open Former world No. 1 Ryu dropped out on the second playoff hole when she missed a birdie putt but Park and Choi continued until luck and nature intervened. COMMENT First Published: 9th February, 2020 18:36 IST Korea’s Hee Young Park, who came close to quitting golf last year, made par on the fourth hole of a three-way playoff Sunday to win the LPGA Tour’s Victoria Open from compatriots Hye-Jin Choi and So Yeon Ryu.On a course swept by a boisterous wind and as evening closed in Park, Choi and Ryu returned repeatedly to the tee on the dog-leg par-5 18th to play out a gripping finale after finishing tied at 281, 8-under par.Former world No. 1 Ryu dropped out on the second playoff hole when she missed a birdie putt but Park and Choi continued until luck and nature intervened.Choi’s tee shot on the fourth playoff hole came to rest against a pine cone in light rough left of the fairway, leaving her with no choice but to chip out. Her attempt to do so came up short, she put her next into a hazard, dropped out, and finally reached the fringe of the green in six.Park had an eagle putt to win the tournament on the first playoff hole but saw it slide by the cup. She faced three more holes in tough conditions before clinching her third LPGA title.”Last year was the worst year in my life and I had to go to q-school and I was going to stop golf because I thought (there was) no more game in my mind,” Park said. “Then I made q-school and I had a chance to play another year this year.”I never stopped and I think God gave to me this present.”The tournament at the 13th Beach Golf Links also feature a European Tour men’s tournament running alongside the women’s event.After Saturday’s third round, the men’s and women’s fields were reduced to 35 players each plus ties. The final round was played on the Beach course which was one of two courses used in the first two rounds along with the Creek course.Australia’s Min Woo Lee held his nerve on a day of high winds and high drama to win his first professional title in the same tournament his sister Minjee Lee won as an amateur in 2014 and again as a professional in 2018.Minjee Lee, who finished in a tie for sixth in the women’s event, was beside the 18th green when Min Woo tapped in a birdie putt to win the title by two shots from New Zealander Ryan Fox.Lee, 21, began the final round three shots clear of three-time European Tour winner Marcus Fraser and fellow Australian Travis Smyth. But his main challenge came unexpectedly from Fox who carded an 8-under 64 in his final round to move to 17 under for the tournament and to place pressure on the lead.Lee led by two shots at 19 under coming to the 17th but bogeyed and reached his final hole with only a one shot lead over Fox.He didn’t falter. He found the fairway, then the green to leave himself a 12 foot birdie put which ended just inches wide of the hole and tapped in for a win which has been long anticipated.”I just played awesome and I’m proud of myself,” Lee said after embracing his sister.”I was walking off 14 and I heard a roar and I was guessing (Fox) or someone in that group had made eagle or birdie. I just counted up and figured he could have eagled 16 or birdied 17 and eagled 18.”He was right. Fox birdied 16 and eagled 18 to complete his charge up the leaderboard.Fraser shared third with Robin Sciot-Siegrist of France who shot 68 to finish 14-under.(Image Credit: Pixabay/Representative Image) Associated Press Television News center_img FOLLOW US WATCH US LIVE Written By LIVE TVlast_img read more

Donegal fish processor fined €45,000 for tampering with weighing scales

first_imgA Donegal fish processing plant and a company director have been fined €45,000 in total for tampering with weighing scales used to measure incoming fish catches.This follows a joint investigation carried out by NSAI (National Standards Authority of Ireland) and the Sea Fisheries Protection Agency (SFPA). Norfish Ltd, based in Killybegs, and director Tony Byrne, were handed down the sentence today at Donegal Circuit Court.Mr. Byrne of Roshin Rd in Killybegs was given a six-month suspended prison sentence and ordered to pay €10,000 to a local hospice in Killybegs, and a further €10,000 to the Donegal Branch of the RNLI. Norfish Ltd was given three months to pay a €25,000 fine.The inspection carried out by NSAI’s Legal Metrology division found that an electrical switch had been fitted to the company’s flow scales used to weigh incoming fish catches. This switch could be used to turn off the scales, allowing the fish to pass over without being weighed. Tampering with measuring instruments used in trade and rendering them inaccurate as a result is an offence under the Legal Metrology Act 1996.Welcoming today’s sentencing at Donegal Circuit Court, NSAI’s Head of Legal Metrology, Paul Turner, said it is important to encourage high measurement compliance in trading transactions to support a fair and competitive environment for businesses and protect consumers.“Today’s outcome recognises the seriousness of the offence. We take non-compliance in any sector, whether it’s the fisheries sector or any other sector covered under our legislation, very seriously,” said Turner.“We will continue to be very vigilant in this sector and if we find any further non-compliance in this area, we will use the full powers of the legislation available to us to deal effectively with it,” he added.NSAI was first alerted to this case in December 2013 by the Sea Fisheries Protection Agency (SFPA).The fisheries regulator had made an unannounced inspection, during which they uncovered non-compliance at the plant. During that inspection, the SFPA noticed that fish were being carried along a conveyor belt and over the flow scales, but were not being weighed. The Sea Fisheries Protection Agency withdrew Norfish Ltd’s permit to weigh on site at this time. Legal Metrology conducted an inspection under Metrology Legislation on the 4th of December, 2013.Commenting on the verdict, Susan Steele, Chair, SFPA said it is an important outcome for the fishing industry.“Breaches such as these threaten the continuation of in-factory weighing for the entire industry, which is permitted under a special exemption negotiated with the SFPA. This facility can continue only while the accuracy and correct use of those weighing systems is guaranteed,” said Steele.“Mis-weighing distorts the declaration of catches and undermines the accuracy of data on stocks used by scientists to determine quota and could affect the long term sustainability of our valuable fisheries and the coastal communities that rely on them,” she added.The inspection carried out by Legal Metrology on the 4th of December resulted in the flow scales being withdrawn from use and Norfish Ltd was issued with a notice to rectify the detected non-compliance.“Measurement is everywhere throughout the economy and it is a system built on trust,” said NSAI Chief Executive, Geraldine Larkin.“Nobody wants to have to dispute every quantity they purchase. There has to be a high level of trust and ensuring the accuracy of all measuring instruments used in trade is an important part of that system,” she added.NSAI’s Legal Metrology division inspected over 14,200 instruments last year. The sectors covered by this public good service include food production, fuel delivery, export enterprises, taxis and local retailers. NSAI’s work in this area is complimented by a network of authorised verifiers, which supports business needs for a professional verification service arising because of new installations, wear and tear, repairs and maintenance requirements over the measuring instruments’ lifetime. The impact of the inspection regime is evidenced by the high compliance rates achieved following the first inspection.Donegal fish processor fined €45,000 for tampering with weighing scales was last modified: March 29th, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more