Psychiatrist Calls for Early Intervention Against Misuse of Drugs

first_imgRelatedSee Food as Medicine – Nutritionist Advertisements RelatedHagley Park Health Centre to be Renovated Story HighlightsRegional Psychiatrist with the Western Regional Health Authority (WRHA), Dr. Lizbeth Crossman, is appealing to parents and teachers to engage children in education on the dangers of drug misuse from as early as basic school.In an interview with JIS News, Dr. Crossman said “the ways in which young people use and misuse drugs are usually dependent on what knowledge they are given and from whom they get the knowledge.”The psychiatrist added that many persons are not aware of the negative effects of substance misuse on the body and in many instances the initiation takes place at an early age. Phase 2 of the training programme is currently underway in Kingston from February 4 to 10. The training is funded through a grant from the Organisation of American States/Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS/CICAD) and focuses on adolescent brain development and substance use; principles of adolescent treatment intervention models; and best practices in youth drug treatment. Photo: ContributedRegional Psychiatrist with the Western Regional Health Authority, Dr. Lizbeth Crossman, engages mental health and counselling professionals in the western region on the latest techniques in drug treatment for adolescents. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedRenewed Focus on Mental Health Psychiatrist Calls for Early Intervention Against Misuse of Drugs Health & WellnessFebruary 7, 2015Written by: Peta-Gay Hodges Psychiatrist Calls for Early Intervention Against Misuse of DrugsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Regional Psychiatrist with the Western Regional Health Authority (WRHA), Dr. Lizbeth Crossman, is appealing to parents and teachers to engage children in education on the dangers of drug misuse from as early as basic school.In an interview with JIS News, Dr. Crossman said “the ways in which young people use and misuse drugs are usually dependent on what knowledge they are given and from whom they get the knowledge.” “We are encouraging education of our parents and children and it needs to start in basic, infant or prep schools, so that they can identify and understand a bit more about these choices that can be very deleterious to their health,” she added.She was speaking against the background of the recently completed Phase 1 of the training of 50 mental health and counselling professionals on the latest techniques in drug treatment for adolescents, that was held in the Western Region from January 26 to February 1.The psychiatrist added that many persons are not aware of the negative effects of substance misuse on the body and in many instances the initiation takes place at an early age. She added that parents and caregivers should also look out for change in behaviours in children and young people and seek help early because the earlier the intervention, the better it is for the child“We are seeing the predisposition to serious mental illnesses. People are presenting with an initial diagnosis of psychosis at teenage, displaying behaviours such as not being in touch with reality, hearing voices, or believing things that are not in keeping with their social context, being withdrawn or being very aggressive. In a majority of these cases, after five years they may present with chronic mental illnesses,” Dr. Crossman said.Young people are also being encouraged to read about drugs and the long lasting effects that many have on the body and mental health, and to become familiar with the research that has been done on the effects of drug misuse. “Recognise what the studies are saying and the risk of injury on the brain from the misuse of these substances,” she urged. Dr. Crossman added that in many cases the lure of the drug is exacerbated by a feeling of being invincible and that the tragedy of others could not happen to them. “If we don’t impact the behaviours now, we are going to be having significant challenges on both education and our social systems. We are seeing significant impact on the learning of our children. We will have more persons not being able to complete high school, have a job, provide for themselves and impact the nation positively,” she warned. “Drug misuse and behavioural problems can be life threatening and can lead to criminal behaviour. They will find ways to survive and to support the habit,” Dr. Crossman added.last_img read more

Maingot nominated to lead the Health Law Section

first_imgMaingot nominated to lead the Health Law Section The Health Law Section’s Nominating Committee has nominated the following officers for 2021-22: Adam Maingot for chair, Radha Bachman for chair-elect, Jason Mehta for treasurer, and Jamaal Jones for secretary.JoAnn Guerrero will serve as the immediate past chair.The committee nominated the following members to the executive council for the 2021-2024 term: Jamie Gelfman, Ruparsari Lloyd, Michael Magidson, Bruce Lamb, Elena Kohn, Grant Dearborn, Mary Ann Moore, and Megan Heiden. If approved by the executive council, Gelfman, Lloyd, and Magidson will be serving their second three-year terms. Lamb, Kohn, Dearborn, Moore, and Heiden will be serving their first three-year term.The Health Law Section will elect its officers and executive council members at the executive council’s annual meeting to be held on June 10 during The Florida Bar’s Annual Convention in Orlando.Pursuant to Article VII, Section 4 of the section bylaws, other nominations to the executive council may be made by petition signed by at least 15 voting members of the section. The petition must be filed with the chair on or before May 10. Petitions may be emailed to Guerrero, at [email protected] with a copy to the section’s program administrator, Emily Young, at [email protected] Apr 29, 2021 Regular Newslast_img read more

Some L.A. County businesses could reopen Friday

first_imgHomeBusinessSome L.A. County businesses could reopen Friday May. 07, 2020 at 5:55 amBusinessFeaturedNewsSome L.A. County businesses could reopen FridayMatthew Hall1 year agobusinesscoronavirusCOVID-19Officials in March ordered would-be shoppers to stay at home. (Matthew Hall) Los Angeles County officials outlined plans Wednesday to begin the slow process of reopening Los Angeles and acknowledged that the public could soon return to the county’s beaches.Supervisor Kathryn Barger said some businesses could open as soon as this Friday with a relaxing of the Safer At Home order in partnership with recent orders from Gov. Gavin Newsom.She said toy shops, bookstores, car dealerships, clothing retailers, sporting goods stores and music stores will be able to offer curbside pickup Friday. County trails and golf courses can reopen Saturday.“Our guidelines will certainly look different than others,” she said. “When we reopen, slowly but surely, we must maintain physical distancing, continue to wear face coverings and rely on pickup and delivery.”She said the first wave of openings are less about the kind of product sold and more about the ability to maintain social distancing.Ferrer said there are several measurements that need to be in place before reopening is expanded.“The first is that we need to be sure there’s adequate capacity in our healthcare system,” she said. “And this means that we need adequate health care staffing ventilators personal protection equipment and testing capacity at our hospitals. It also means maintaining surge capacity at the hospitals in case there’s a sharp rise in people who have become seriously ill from COVID-19.”She said the second prerequisite is to ensure that vulnerable populations are protected. Ferrer said there needs to be adequate personal protective equipment and staffing to manage care in institutional settings.“The third prerequisite is that we need to make sure that there’s capacity to test, trace and isolate,” she said. “This means being able to test people when it’s appropriate. It also means being able to trace and isolate individuals who are positive for COVID-19, and to have their close contacts quarantine. And we do need to collect data electronically from both providers and labs, including data on race and ethnicity, to allow us again to better understand the spread of COVID-19 across our communities.”She said the final step is establishing protocols to keep workers, customers and residents safe as they reenter the workplace.Beaches are not specifically mentioned in the first wave of openings, but Ferrer said there is a plan to reopen the sand.“… there is a plan, it will go in effect at some point in the very near future that will allow again for a slow reopening of our beaches in a way that’s as safe as possible but I do want to thank everyone who’s been working on that plan. And I know that we can all look forward to that happening pretty soon.”The county has a five-stage program for reopening with more businesses allowed to open in each stage with an analysis of case spread necessary before the county moves from stage to stage.Stage 1 is the current Safer at Home rule. Friday would mark the start of Stage 2 with some non-essential businesses opening. Stage 3 includes higher-risk businesses such as theaters and schools. Stage 4 would include the most at-risk businesses such as sports venues and large conventions. Stage 5 is a return to pre-virus operations.Eventually, the Stage 2 openings would include cultural venues such as museums and galleries but Ferrer said all reopened businesses would do so with new rules to limit contact between patrons.“So, as we move through the stages of recovery, we will be issuing protocols for each sector, on what measures, they must take to slow the spread of COVID-19,” she said. “And these do include protecting and supporting workers and customers for their health and their safety, limiting in person work and ensuring that vulnerable workers have alternate assignments, providing cloth face coverings and personal protective equipment to all employees and asking that anyone entering the business, also wear a cloth face covering.”She said the number of customers in a business will also be limited and the county will be tracking the spread of the disease following each step to evaluate if new businesses can reopen without endangering the public.To date, Public Health has identified 28,644 positive cases of COVID-19 across all areas of L.A. County, and a total of 1,367 deaths. There are currently 198 confirmed cases in Santa [email protected] :businesscoronavirusCOVID-19share on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentSanta Monica Employee Recognized as Banner Bank’s BestSouthern California heads into peak of spring heat waveYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall6 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson17 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter17 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor17 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press17 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press17 hours agolast_img read more